Patient Info

  • Accepted Insurances

    We currently accept HMO insurances if you are a member of the following medical groups:

    Redlands Yucaipa Medical Group
    Pinnacle Medical Group
    PrimeCare Medical Group

    We currently accept the following PPO insurances:

    AARP
    Access Health Direct
    Acordia National
    Advance Benefit Resources
    Aetna
    Aetna US Healthcare
    Affilia Healthcare Admin
    AFTRA Health Fund
    Allied Benefit Systems
    Altius Helath Plans
    Amerahealth Administrators
    Amerbien/IEC Group
    American Community
    American Insurance Administrators
    APWU Health Plan
    Assurant Health
    Aurora Direct
    BeechStreet
    Ben Elect
    Benefit Administrative Systems
    Benefit Advantage
    Benefit Plan Administrators
    Benesight
    Big Lots Associate Benefit Plan
    Blue Cross
    Blue Shield
    BRMS
    California Field Ironworkers
    CBA
    CBCA Administrators
    CCN
    Cement Masons Claim Office
    Champ VA
    Christian Care Processing Center
    Cigna
    Cigna Healthcare
    Cinergy Health Inc.
    Claims Central
    COMM Net Communications
    Community Care Network
    Comprehensive Care Services
    Connecticut General Life Co.
    Coresource
    Coventry Healthcare
    Delta Health Systems
    Design Benefits Administrators
    EBAM Credit Corp.
    EBMS
    First Health
    FISERV Health
    FMH Benefit Services
    GEHA
    Gilsbar, Inc.
    Global Medical Management
    Great West
    Great West Life and Annuity
    Group Resources, Inc.
    Guardian
    Health Plan, Inc.
    Health Plus Insurance Co.
    HealthNet
    Healthscope Benefits
    Hewitt Coleman Associates
    Hometown Health
    Humana
    IAA
    IBEW-NECA Health Plan
    Independent Health
    Insurance Center
    Kennan Associates
    Labor Trust Fund
    Laborers Health and Welfare
    Laundry & Dry Cleaning Workers
    Lifeguard Insurance
    Lifeline Screening of America
    Los Angeles Fireman Relief
    Lumenos
    Major League Baseball
    Medical Institute
    Medicare
    Mid West National Life Insurance Co.
    Mo-Kan Sheet Metal Workers
    MPI Health
    Mutual Assurance Administration
    Mutual of Omaha
    Nationwide Health Plan
    Nationwide Insurance
    Nationwide Specialty Health Co.
    NBC Health
    NGS American
    Nippon Life Insurance Co.
    NPPN-BAMF
    Operating Engineers Health
    Oxford Health Plans
    PAI
    Performax
    Personal Insurance Administrators
    Physician’s Care
    Pioneer Management System, Inc.
    Pittman & Associates, Inc.
    Plan Administrator Local 1014
    PPO Next
    Preferred One Administrative
    Primary Physician Care
    Private Healthcare
    Riverside County Foundation Medical Care
    SAG-Producers Health Plan
    San Diego Electrical Health and Welfare Trust
    Secure Horizons
    Security Administrative Services
    Sheet Metal Workers
    Smith Administrators
    Southern California Drug Benefit
    Southern California Pipe Traders
    Southwest Administrator
    Southwest Carpenters Health and Welfare
    SRC Claims Department
    STAR Bridge
    Star HRG
    State Farm Insurance Co.
    Student Insurance
    Tall Tree Administrators
    TCS
    Teamsters Security Fund
    The Capella Group
    The J.P. Farley Corporation
    The Mail Handlers Benefit Plan
    The Plan Handlers, Inc.
    Time Insurance Company
    TPSC
    UFCW
    UFCW Unions & Food Employers
    UniCare
    United Agriculture Benefit Trust
    United Healthcare
    United Medical Resources, Inc.
    University of MO Claims
    USAA Life Insurance Company
    VA MC Fee Services
    WASAU Benefits
    Washington-Idaho Carpenters
    Watkins Associated Industries
    WEYCO Inc.
    WMI/TPA Care VU
    Woodward Healthcare Services
    Younglife Benefits

  • New Patient Information

    We are currently welcoming new patients for obstetrical and gynecological care. For your first visit, please arrive about 20 minutes before your appointment time. If you have been under the care of another physician, please have the records sent to us prior to your first appointment. If you are taking medications, please bring the names and dosages with you. You can expedite your visit if you complete the following forms, prior to your appointment. Please call to find out if you need a referral from your Primary Care Physician, before your appointment.

    Click on each form to complete online or print out and complete manually; please print clearly.

    Patient Registration Form
    Patient Medical History Form
    Assignment of Benefits Acknowledgement
    Financial Responsibility Acknowledgement
    HIPAA Consent
    Office Policies Acknowledgement

    Consent for HIV & Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing-Pregnancy only

    We participate in many local and national insurance plans. Please call our office at (909) 748-6065 to verify that we are a participating provider with your insurance plan. Out-of-network visits are also welcome. Special arrangements can be made with most insurance plans.

    We respect the value of your time and want to spare you long waits. Our specialty does involve emergency procedures, surgical delays, and the least predictable of all, deliveries; consequently, we ask for your understanding. If Dr. Hage is running behind, our staff will try to notify you, or Debbie Monroy, RNP may be able to see you. You may also call prior to your visit to see if we anticipate any delays. We also request that you arrive promptly for your visit so other patients are not delayed. If you are unable to keep your appointment or are going to be late, please call the office as soon as possible. A cancellation fee will apply if your appointment is not cancelled 24 hours prior. CLICK HERE to see our office hours and location.

  • Pregnancy Information

    Summary of Prenatal Visits

    (8-12 weeks)

    • History and physical exam including Pap smear. “Quick Peek” ultrasound.
    • Order prenatal labs, review first trimester prenatal screening.
    • Discuss prenatal issues.
    • Orientation to the practice staff and website.

    (12-16 weeks)

    • Discuss prenatal lab results.
    • Listen for fetal heart tones.

    (16-20 weeks )

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • Prenatal screening blood tests drawn if desired.
    • Amniocentesis may be done for patients over the age of 34.

    Information for Cord Blood Banking is given (Please CLICK HERE for more information).

    (18-22 weeks)

    • An obstetric ultrasound may be ordered about this time. The ultrasound will usually be done at outside facility depending on insurance. Please have a very full bladder for the ultrasound.

    (24-28 weeks)

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • One hour glucose test and hematocrit is done. (You will drink a glucose solution and blood will be drawn one hour after drinking the glucose. Fasting is not necessary, but is advised.)
    • Patients who are interested in taking childbirth education classes should register for these classes with Redlands Community Hospital.

    (28 weeks)

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • A Rhogam shot is given to patients who have Rh negative blood type.
    • Review information about warning signs of premature labor and fetal movement counts.

    (30-32 weeks)

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • Check for the baby’s position.
    • Take Labor & Delivery Tour.
    • Register at Redlands Community Hospital.
    • CLICK HERE for Redlands Community Hospital registration form.

    (34-36 weeks)

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • Check for the baby’s position.
    • Obtain Group B strep culture of the vagina and rectum.
    • Discuss Labor and Delivery.
    • Discuss Maternity Leave.
    • Discuss information about when to call.

    (36 weeks)

    Maternity Leave begins for normal pregnancy. CLICK HERE for Maternity Leave forms or go to California EDD website to register.

    (37-39 weeks)

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • Check for the baby’s position.
    • Check for cervical dilation (about 38 weeks).
    • Discuss management plan for delivery on an individual basis.

    (40 weeks)

    • Listen for fetal heart tones and check uterine size.
    • Cervical examination.
    • Check for the baby’s position.
    • Discuss management plan for delivery on an individual basis.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Medications and Pregnancy

    Tylenol and Extra Strength Tylenol are safe at any point during the pregnancy in usual doses. We do not recommend other pain relievers such as Advil, Aleve, Motrin or aspirin.

    Over-the-counter antacids are safe in pregnancy. Either the liquids such as Maalox or Mylanta, or tablets such as Tums, Rolaids or Zantac are acceptable. Remember that these are usually safe in the normally prescribed dosages and overuse or prolonged use may be harmful to you or your baby.

    For nausea and vomiting of early pregnancy (“morning sickness”), the over-the-counter sleeping pill Unisom often has an anti-nausea effect, although it may make you sleepy. You may take ½ to 1 tablet at night, and this often has a residual effect into the next day. You may also take a ½ tablet in the morning if necessary. Vitamin B-6 50 mg twice a day (also known as Pyridoxine) may also be helpful for “morning sickness.”

    Over-the-counter cold medicines are fine during any stage of the pregnancy. However, we do not recommend cold syrups that have alcohol in them or combination cold preparations which have Advil or aspirin in them.

    The following are suggested medications for specific conditions:

    • Headaches- Tylenol
    • Fever – Tylenol
    • Congestion – Saline
    • nasal spray or Sudafed (not before 3 months)
    • Cough – Robitussin
    • Sore Throat – any throat lozenge or Tylenol
    • Muscle Aches – Tylenol
    • Runny Nose – Any over-the-counter antihistamine such as Claritin
    • Constipation – Prune juice, fresh vegetables, water, Metamucil, Colace
    • Diarrhea – Imodium
    • Yeast Infections – Monistat

    Most antibiotics are also safe during pregnancy. Avoid the tetracycline family, and the quinolone family (such as Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin and others). However, feel free to check with us if you need to take any prescription medication just to be sure. You can also ask the pharmacist to check the pregnancy category of any medications that you need to take. In general, Category A and B medications are safe, if you really need to take them. Avoid Category C medications unless you have a medical condition that can only be treated with those medications. Avoid Category D medications unless a life-threatening situation exists. And finally, you should absolutely not be exposed to any Category X medications if you are or may become pregnant.
    Always notify us if you have a fever of 101º F or higher, or if your symptoms persist after trying the above treatments.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Benefits of Breastfeeding

    BENEFITS TO MOTHER AND FAMILY
    • Convenience: no mixing or measuring formula.
    • Effective, free postpartum contraception for 3 to 6 months (98% to 99.5% effective if you continue to not have periods).
    • Free source of nutrition.
    • Produces no waste.
    • Promotes postpartum healing.
    • Minimizes medical expenses.
    • Reduces parental absences from work due to child’s illnesses.
    • Lowers risk of ovarian cancer and pre-menopausal breast cancer in mother.
    • Enhances mother-baby relationship.

    BENEFITS TO INFANTS
    • Superior nutrition.
    • Better brain development.
    • Reduced risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (a life-threatening intestinal infection) especially in premature infants.
    • Reduced risk of sudden infant death syndrome.
    • Increased resistance to other infections such as otitis media (ear infections) and diarrheal disease.
    • Fewer allergies.
    • Fewer stomach upsets.
    • Lower risk of cancers.
    • Emotional security and improved developmental outcome.

    
This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Exercise and Weight Gain During Pregnancy

    If you have been exercising–that’s great. Continue to do so. If you have not been exercising–start slowly. Try walking for 10 minutes five times per week. Gradually increase to 30 to 40 minutes per day.

    GUIDELINES TO EXERCISE IN PREGNANCY:
    • Regular exercise, at least three times per week, is preferable to intermittent exercise.
    • Exercise in the supine position (lying on your back) should be avoided after the first trimester, since this position is associated with decreased cardiac output in pregnancy.
    • A pregnant woman should stop exercising when fatigued, and should not exercise to exhaustion, keeping in mind that oxygen availability for exercise decreases during pregnancy.
    • Some weight-bearing exercises may be continued throughout pregnancy at intensities similar to those maintained prior to pregnancy. Non weight-bearing exercise, such as swimming or cycling, pose less risk of injury.
    • Women who exercise during pregnancy should be particularly careful to ensure an adequate diet.
    • In the first trimester, pregnant women should pay particular attention to avoid becoming too hot during exercise by wearing appropriate clothing and drinking adequate fluids.
    • If any of the following conditions occur during pregnancy, exercise may need to be restricted:
    Pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-term rupture of membranes, pre-term labor during prior or current pregnancy, incompetent cervix, cerclage, bleeding in pregnancy, intrauterine growth restriction.

    Bottom Line: You may exercise throughout your pregnancy. Walking, running, swimming, aerobics, and moderate weight training are all acceptable.

    We do not recommend contact sports or sports where you are likely to fall such as snow skiing, water skiing, or horseback riding beyond the first trimester. You may have sex throughout the pregnancy if your pregnancy has been uncomplicated.

    Source: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

    WEIGHT GAIN IN PREGNANCY
    The usual weight gain in pregnancy is 25 to 35 pounds for the entire pregnancy. Most of this weight gain comes in the second and third trimester at a rate of about 1 pound per week. Weight gain is variable in the first trimester. You may even lose some weight as your appetite may be decreased. If you are overweight, you do not need to gain as much weight.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Prenatal Genetic Screening

    FIRST TRIMESTER SCREENING:
    First Trimester screening is a screening test for Down Syndrome and Trisomy 18 performed between 10 and 14 weeks of pregnancy. It involves nuchal translucency ultrasound and serum screening. These data are then combined to give a new individual risk for Down Syndrome and Trisomy 18. The detection rate for Down Syndrome is 83% and for Trisomy 18 is 80%. Integrated screening involves a first sample of blood and a nuchal translucency ultrasound between 10 and 14 weeks of pregnancy and a second blood specimen between 15 and 20 weeks of pregnancy. It screens for Down Syndrome, Trisomy 18 and open neural tube defects.  These data are combined to give a new individual risk. Of the available screening tests, this method has the highest detection rates for Down Syndrome and Trisomy 18, 93% and 90%, respectively.

    AFP TESTING:
    AFP is a protein made by the baby and secreted into the amniotic fluid and mother’s blood stream. Elevated levels of AFP can be found in certain conditions such as spina bifida, anencephaly (failure of brain and skull development), abdominal wall defects, fetal death, twin gestation, or inaccurate dating of the pregnancy. An elevation of the AFP, even with a normal amniocentesis, can be associated with a higher risk of problems in the third trimester. Some of these include placental separation (abruption), preterm labor, poor fetal growth, pregnancy induced hypertension, increased risk of stillbirth, and a lack of amniotic fluid. Low levels of AFP have been associated with a higher risk of chromosome problems such as Down Syndrome.

    Screening of the mother’s blood allows us to check for the possibility of some of these potential problems. The blood test that is drawn is called the triple screen or tri-screen. It includes an AFP, an estrogen level, and a hCG level. The tri-screen is more accurate at predicting a chromosome problem compared to the AFP alone. The majority of babies born with Down syndrome are born to women over the age of 35, even though the risk of Down syndrome is 1:270 live births. An amniocentesis is usually recommended for women who will deliver by the time they are 35 or older. For those younger than 35, the tri-screen will be positive in 60 – 65 percent of Down syndrome babies. The AFP will be elevated in greater than 90 percent of cases involving brain, spinal cord, or abdominal wall defects. If a tri-screen or AFP is abnormal, an ultrasound is recommended. An amniocentesis may also be recommended since the tri-screen is only a screening test. The amniocentesis could determine if a problem really exists. A normal triple screen does not necessarily guarantee a normal baby.

    The tri-screen and amniocentesis are both optional tests. A decision whether to have the test or not is usually a personal choice. A woman who would not have an abortion may still want to consider the testing in order to help prepare herself, her family, and her doctors for the birth of a baby with special needs. Most chromosomal abnormalities other than Down syndrome are not detected by the tri-screen. An amniocentesis or other procedure called a chorionic villous sampling (CVS) are the only nearly 100% accurate tests for Down syndrome as well as other chromosomal problems.

    If you choose to have this test done, the blood work should be drawn between 15 and 20 weeks, along with other prenatal laboratory work. The results are usually back in our office in approximately one to two weeks. If you are 35 or older and are going to have an amniocentesis, the tri-screen is done a few days before your amniocentesis. This will help us determine if you will be at risk of any of the third trimester problems mentioned previously.

    CYSTIC FIBROSIS TESTING:
    A. What is Cystic Fibrosis (CF)?
    • CF is an inherited disease that affects more that 25,000 American children and young adults.
    • Symptoms of CF vary but include lung congestion, pneumonia, diarrhea and poor growth. Most CF does not affect intelligence.
    • Although there is no cure for CF at this time, scientists are making progress in improving treatment and in searching for a cure. In the past many people with CF died at a very young age. Today many are living into their 20’s and 30’s.

    B. Is there a chance my baby could have Cystic Fibrosis?
    • You can have a child with CF even if there is no history in your family.
    • CF testing can help determine if you are a carrier and at risk to have a child with CF.
    • If both parents are carriers, there is a 1 in 4 (25%) chance, with each pregnancy, that they will have a child with CF. Carriers have on normal CF gene and one altered CF gene.
    • People with CF have two altered CF genes.
    • Most people have two normal copies of the CF gene.

    C. What testing is available for CF?
    • There is a blood test that can be done to find out if you or your partner is a carrier.
    • A National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus statement developed by a panel of experts representing medical, legal, ethical and public perspectives recommends that CF carrier testing be offered to any couple planning a pregnancy and to any individual with a family history of CF.
    • It is important to understand that CF carrier testing does not detect all CF carriers.
    • If the test shows that you are both CF carriers, you unborn baby can be tested to find out if baby has CF.

    D. How much does it cost to have Cystic Fibrosis carrier testing?
    • Cost and insurance coverage for CF carrier testing vary depending upon the laboratory used and your insurance policy.
    • The average cost for CF carrier testing is $450 – $950 per person.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Group B Strep Infections and Screening

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that causes illness in newborn babies. GBS is the most common cause of life-threatening infections in newborns.
    It is the most common cause of sepsis (blood infection) and meningitis in newborns. GBS is a frequent cause of newborn pneumonia. In pregnant women, GBS can cause bladder infections, womb infections, and stillbirth.
    Many people carry GBS in their bodies but do not become ill. These people are considered to be “carriers.” Adults can carry GBS in the bowel, vagina, bladder, or throat. One of every five pregnant women carries GBS in the rectum or vagina. A fetus may come in contact with GBS before or during birth if the mother carries GBS in the rectum or vagina. People who carry GBS typically do so temporarily — that is, they do not become lifelong carriers of the bacteria.
    GBS carriage can be detected during pregnancy by taking a swab of both the vagina and rectum for special culture around 35-37 weeks of pregnancy; cultures collected earlier do not accurately predict whether a mother will have GBS at delivery. A positive culture result means that the mother carries GBS — not that she or her baby will definitely become ill. Women who carry GBS should not be given oral antibiotics before labor because antibiotic treatment at this time does not prevent GBS disease in newborns. An exception to this is when GBS is identified in urine during pregnancy. GBS in the urine should be treated at the time it is diagnosed. Carriage of GBS, in either the vagina or rectum, becomes important at the time of labor and delivery — when antibiotics are effective in preventing the spread of GBS from mother to baby.
    Most GBS disease in newborns can be prevented by giving certain pregnant women antibiotics through the vein during labor. Any pregnant woman who previously had a baby with GBS disease or who has a urinary tract infection caused by GBS should receive antibiotics during labor. Pregnant women who carry GBS should be offered antibiotics at the time of labor or membrane rupture.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Symptoms of Premature Labor

    Occasional, mild, irregular contractions (so-called Braxton-Hicks contractions) are normal in the second half of pregnancy. However, it is not normal to have frequent contractions prior to 37 weeks (3 weeks before your due date).
    The following is a list of warning symptoms of premature labor:
    1. Regular uterine tightening or contractions occurring 4 or more times per hour. This may feel as though the baby is “rolling up into a ball.” Your uterus may become tight or hard. You may also perceive contractions as a rhythmic low backache. Contractions may feel like severe menstrual cramps.
    2. An unusual rhythmic or persistent pelvic pressure.
    3. A large amount of mucus or watery discharge leaking from the vagina. This is especially concerning if the discharge has a red, pink, or brown color. Any vaginal bleeding should be immediately reported to a nurse or doctor at our office.

    If you have any of these symptoms prior to 37 weeks, you should stop any strenuous activity, rest on your left side, and push fluids. Try to drink at least 4 large glasses of water as soon as you can. If the symptoms persist despite fluids and rest for one hour, you should call the office to speak with a nurse or a doctor. After office hours, you should call the office, and a doctor will return your call. You may need to come to the office or to the hospital for evaluation.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Measures for Well-being and Prevention of Preterm Labor

    • Rest two to three times a day lying on your left side.
    • Drink 2 to 3 quarts of water or fruit juice each day. Avoid caffeine drinks. Filling a quart container and drinking from it will eliminate the need to keep track of numerous glasses of fluid.
    • Empty your bladder at least every two hours during waking hours.
    • Avoid lifting heavy objects. If other small children are in the home, work out alternatives for picking them up, such as sitting on a chair and having them climb up on your lap.
    • Avoid prenatal breast preparation such as nipple rolling or rubbing nipples with a towel. This is not meant to discourage breast feeding but to avoid potential increase of uterine irritability from nipple stimulation.
    • Pace necessary activities to avoid overexertion.
    • Sexual activity may need to be modified or eliminated if you have premature labor signs.
    • Find pleasurable ways to help compensate for limitations of activities and boost spirits – massages, manicures and pedicures.
    • Try to focus on one day or one week at a time rather than longer periods of time.
    • If on bed rest, get dressed each day and rest on a couch rather than becoming isolated in the bedroom.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    When to Call the Doctor?

    If you are 37 weeks or more (within 3 weeks of your due date), you should call if any of the following occur:
    1. Consistent, regular, painful contractions which have been occurring every 5 minutes (from the start of one contraction until the start of the next contraction) for at least one hour. Each contraction should last 30 to 60 seconds or more. OR contractions occurring every 10 minutes for at least one hour if you live more than 30 minutes from the hospital, if you have a history of a fast labor, or if you were dilated 3 or more centimeters at your last visit.
    2. Vaginal bleeding. A small amount of spotting is normal for a day or two after a vaginal examination. Any other vaginal bleeding should be immediately reported to a nurse or a doctor at our office.
    3. Rupture of membranes. If you break your bag of water, or if you think you might be leaking amniotic fluid, you should call right away. You will need to come to the office or to the hospital for evaluation.
    4. Decreased fetal movement. The baby should move at least 12 times a day. This should continue right up to the baby’s birth. If you think that your baby is not moving that much, lie down on your left side after eating and count fetal movements. You should feel at least 4 in an hour. If you still don’t feel at least 4 movements in an hour, call immediately. You will need to come to the office or to the hospital for fetal monitoring. CLICK HERE for fetal movement record form.

    How do I contact Dr. Hage?
    During our office hours (8:00am to 5:00pm Monday-Thursday, Friday 8:00am to 1:00pm), you may call the office (909)-748-6065 to speak with a nurse. After office hours you may also call our office for emergencies. A provider will return your call. The nurse or doctor will help you decide whether you should go to the hospital.

    NOTE: During office hours, EXCEPT IN AN EMERGENCY, please do not go directly to the hospital without speaking to an office provider or nurse.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Umbilical Cord Blood Banking

    Umbilical cord blood, traditionally discarded at birth, contains special cells called “stem cells” which can be used in the treatment of nearly 70 life-threatening diseases including certain cancers, such as leukemia, and immune and genetic disorders. Researchers are now looking to cord blood for answers to Stroke, Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Muscular Dystrophy, to name a few. We encourage our expecting moms to visit one of the following sites and learn why preserving your baby’s umbilical cord blood at the time of birth may be one of the most important decisions you can make for your baby’s and your family’s future.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Things to Avoid During Pregnancy

    Smoking, Alcohol, and Recreational drugs: All of these increase the risk of miscarriage, bleeding, smaller babies, premature babies, developmental delays, and other serious complications. Once you know that you are pregnant, it is best to stop completely. Talk to us if you need help.
    Fish that may contain mercury or other contaminants: Shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish are all high in mercury. Other fish, such as striped bass, bluefish, salmon, and fish from local rivers and lakes may contain high levels of PCB’s and other industrial pollutants. Limit all fish , including canned tuna, to less than 12 ounces each week. Shellfish, if cooked properly, is not considered harmful.
    Cat litter and soil: These may contain toxoplasmosis, a harmful parasite. Your cat is safe, but the feces (poop) may not be. Do not change cat litter while pregnant. When gardening, wear rubber or leather gloves and wash fruits and vegetables well.
    Hot tubs and saunas: If you are sweating, it’s too hot for the baby. Otherwise warm baths are very soothing.
    Herbs: Many can be harmful to the baby or start labor. This is a partial list: Black/blue cohosh, buckthorn, cascara, ephedra, feverfew, mandrake, mugwort, senna, tansy, and yarrow. Consult an herbalist or check for a complete list.
    Foods that may contain bacteria or parasites: Raw meats, raw fish, and raw shellfish (sashimi, ceviche, raw oysters, carpaccio); unpasteurized juice; soft cheeses (Brie, feta, goat, camembert, gorgonzola, and Mexican soft cheeses); some deli meats (Salami, liverwurst, and hot dogs may be contaminated. Hot dogs should be well cooked). • Caffeine: limit your intake of caffeine; it may reduce calcium that is available for the baby.
    Artificial sweeteners: Not enough is known about their effects on pregnancy. Occasional or moderate use is considered safe.
    Peanuts and Peanut Butter: If you have a family history of peanut allergies, it may be wise to limit your intake or avoid completely.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

    Travel and Sexual Activity During Pregnancy

    TRAVEL & PREGNANCY
    You may travel by any means including air travel up until one month before your due date if your pregnancy is uncomplicated. After 36 weeks, we recommend that you remain within one hour of a hospital. If you are being monitored for premature labor, travel is not recommended.
    SEATBELT USE
    We recommend that you wear your seatbelt whenever you are riding or driving in a car. Even in the third trimester, it is fine to have the shoulder strap go across the uterus.
    SEXUAL ACTIVITY
    Sex is safe and does not harm the baby. It’s normal to have more interest in sex, less interest in sex or mixed feelings and thoughts about sex. Open communication is important to your relationship. As pregnancy progresses, be creative with position changes. Gentle hugs or caresses can be a sweet substitute for intercourse. Do not have sex if you have vaginal or abdominal pain, blood or fluid leaking from your vagina, have been diagnosed with placenta previa, or have been advised against it by one of us.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

  • Post Op Care and Instructions

    On this page (click links to go to section)
    • Cesarean Section (C-Section)
    • Dilation and Curettage (D & C)
    • Hysterectomy- Abdominal
    • Hysterectomy- Laparoscopic
    • Hysterectomy- Vaginal
    • Pelvic Repairs
    • Tubal Ligation
    • Vaginal Delivery
    • Newborn Circumcision
    • Absorbable Skin Staples


    Cesarean Section (C-Section)

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your back may be sore for a few days from the spinal anesthesia that was used during surgery. If you had general anesthesia, your throat may be sore for a few days from the tube used to put you to sleep. You may also have abdominal and/or shoulder pain from gas that enters your abdomen from having an open surgery. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    You have one incision in your belly, usually in the bikini line. If you have tape strips over the incisions, leave them on for 7 days and then remove them. When you shower, let soapy water run over the incision. Afterward, pat it dry. If a strip starts to fall off, it is okay to remove it. It is normal to have bruising around the incisions.

    PAIN: 
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET: 
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY: 
    You can shower 24 hours after your surgery. Don’t drive for at least 3 weeks after surgery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day. You will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs- it is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 4-6 weeks after your surgery.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE and BLEEDING: 
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for up to 4-6 weeks after surgery. You may have a sudden gush of blood about 2 weeks after delivery; this should not last more than 1-2 days; if it does, call the office. Do not douche for 6 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    Do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-op examination. You may resume sexual intercourse after 6 weeks unless instructed otherwise by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after surgery. To avoid getting constipated, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT: 
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:

    • Call for a same day appointment

    • Go to urgent care.

    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Dilation and Curettage (D & C)

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your throat may be sore for a few days from the breathing tube that was used during surgery. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    PAIN:
    You can take Ibuprofen (Motrin) three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it.

    DIET:
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation.

    ACTIVITY:
    You can shower a few hours after your surgery. Don’t drive for at least 24 hours after surgery. After that, when you are not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day unless otherwise instructed by Dr. Hage.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for a few days after surgery. Do not douche for 6 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    Do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after 6 weeks unless instructed otherwise by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS: 
    Your bowel function should not be affected after surgery. To avoid getting constipated, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT: 
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.

    • Pus coming out of the incision.

    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.

    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.

    • Unable to keep down liquids.

    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:

    • Call for a same day appointment

    • Go to urgent care.

    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Hysterectomy-Abdominal

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your throat may be sore for a few days from the breathing tube that was used during surgery. You may also have abdominal and/or shoulder pain from gas that enters your abdomen from having an open surgery. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    You have one incision in your belly, usually in the bikini line. If you have tape strips over the incisions, leave them on for 7 days and then remove them. When you shower, let soapy water run over the incision. Afterward, pat it dry. If a strip starts to fall off, it is okay to remove it. It is normal to have bruising around the incisions.

    PAIN:
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET:
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY:
    You can shower 24 hours after your surgery. Don’t drive for at least 3 weeks after surgery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day- you will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs. It is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 4-6 weeks after your surgery.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for a few weeks after surgery. Do not douche for 6 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    If your cervix was removed, do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-op examination. If your cervix is still in place, you may resume sexual intercourse after 6 weeks unless instructed otherwise by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after surgery. To avoid getting constipated, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT:
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:
    • Call for a same day appointment
    • Go to urgent care.
    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Hysterectomy-Laparoscopic

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your throat may be sore for a few days from the breathing tube that was used during surgery. You may also have abdominal and/or shoulder pain from gas that we used to inflate your belly during surgery. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    You have 3 or 4 small incisions in your belly. If the incisions are covered by gauze or a clear dressing, you can uncover them 24 hours after surgery. If you have tape strips over the incisions, leave them on for 7 days and then remove them. When you shower, let soapy water run over the incisions. Afterward, pat them dry. If a strip starts to fall off, it’s okay to remove it. It is normal to have redness or bruising around the incisions.

    PAIN:
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET:
    If you aren’t hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY:
    You can shower 24 hours after your surgery. Don’t drive for at least 24 hours after surgery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Don’t stay in bed all day. You will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs. It is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 1-3 weeks after your surgery.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for a few weeks after surgery. Do not douche for 4 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    If your cervix was removed, do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-op examination. If your cervix is still in place, you may resume sexual intercourse when your belly is not sore and when you feel ready, unless otherwise instructed by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after surgery. If you feel constipated after that, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or Colace.
    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT:
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:
    • Call for a same day appointment
    • Go to urgent care.
    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Hysterectomy-Vaginal

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your throat may be sore for a few days from the breathing tube that was used during surgery. You may also have abdominal and/or shoulder pain from gas that enters your abdomen from having surgery. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    You will not have any visible incisions, your incision is inside the vagina. When you shower, avoid getting too much water inside the vagina. Do not sit in a bathtub, unless instructed to do so by Dr. Hage.

    PAIN:
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET:
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY:
    You can shower 24 hours after your surgery. Don’t drive for at least 3 weeks after surgery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day. You will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs. It is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 3-4 weeks after your surgery.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for a few weeks after surgery. Do not douche for 6 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    Do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-op examination. You may resume sexual intercourse after 6 weeks unless instructed otherwise by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after surgery. To avoid getting constipated, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT:
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:
    • Call for a same day appointment
    • Go to urgent care.
    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

     

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    Pelvic Repairs

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your throat may be sore for a few days from the breathing tube that was used during surgery. You may also have abdominal and/or shoulder pain from gas that enters your abdomen from having surgery, if you also had a hysterectomy. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    You will not have any visible incisions, your incision is inside the vagina. You may have an incision similar to an episiotomy. When you shower, avoid getting too much water inside the vagina. Do not sit in a bathtub, unless instructed to do so by Dr. Hage.

    PAIN:
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET:
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY:
    You can shower 24 hours after your surgery. Don’t drive for at least 3 weeks after surgery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day. You will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs. It is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 3-4 weeks after your surgery. With major prolapse repairs, avoid strenuous activity for 6-8 weeks to allow complete healing and avoid recurrence.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for a few weeks after surgery. Do not douche for 6 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    Do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-op examination. You may resume sexual intercourse after 6 weeks unless instructed otherwise by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after surgery. To avoid getting constipated, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT:
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:
    • Call for a same day appointment
    • Go to urgent care.
    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Tubal Ligation

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your throat may be sore for a few days from the breathing tube that was used during surgery. You may also have abdominal and/or shoulder pain from gas that we used to inflate your belly during surgery. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    You have 1 or 2 small incisions in your belly. If the incisions are covered by gauze or a clear dressing, you can uncover them 24 hours after surgery. If you have tape strips over the incisions, leave them on for 7 days and then remove them. When you shower, let soapy water run over the incisions. Afterward, pat them dry. If a strip starts to fall off, it’s okay to remove it. It is normal to have redness or bruising around the incisions.

    PAIN:
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET:
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY:
    You can shower 24 hours after your surgery. Do not drive for at least 24 hours after surgery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day. You will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs. It is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 1-3 days after your surgery.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for a few days after surgery. Do not douche for 1 week after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    Do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-op examination. You may resume sexual intercourse after your next period and when you feel ready, unless otherwise instructed by Dr. Hage.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after surgery. If you feel constipated after that, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or Colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT:
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:
    • Call for a same day appointment
    • Go to urgent care.
    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Vaginal Delivery

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    Your back may be sore for a few days from pushing or from the epidural, if you had one. You may also have muscle soreness from exertion during pushing. These symptoms are not serious. They will go away within a few days.

    INCISIONS:
    If you had an episiotomy or a laceration (tear) in the vagina, use the squirt bottle and rinse your stitches each time you use the bathroom. Use the Dermoplast spray and Tucks wipes as directed. It is often helpful to soak in a warm bathtub once a day.

    PAIN:
    You will get prescriptions for Ibuprofen (Motrin) and possibly a narcotic pain pill (Vicodin or Tylenol #3.) Take Ibuprofen three times a day, with meals, until you no longer need it. If you need them, take the narcotic pain pills in addition, according to the instructions on the bottle.

    DIET:
    If you are not hungry, just drink liquids for the first 24 hours. When you are hungry, eat regular food. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of fruits and vegetables to avoid constipation. If eating regular foods gives you gas pains, go back to clear liquids.

    ACTIVITY:
    Do not drive for at least 48 hours after delivery. After that, when you are no longer taking narcotic pain pills, not feeling drowsy, and you can move around quickly without discomfort, you may begin to drive. Do not stay in bed all day. You will heal faster if you get up and move around the house. You may walk up and downstairs. It is not harmful. When you feel ready for a particular activity (such as light housework or exercise) you can try it. You can expect to be able to return to work approximately 4-6 weeks after your delivery.

    VAGINAL DISCHARGE AND BLEEDING:
    It is normal to have some bleeding or discharge from the vagina for up to 4-6 weeks after delivery. You may have a sudden gush of blood about 2 weeks after delivery; this should not last more than 1-2 days; if it does, call the office. Do not douche for 6 weeks after your surgery.

    INTERCOURSE:
    Do not use tampons or have sexual intercourse until after you have come for a post-partum examination. You may resume sexual intercourse after 6 weeks unless instructed otherwise by Dr. Hage. You may want to consider contraception prior to resuming sexual activity.

    BOWELS:
    It is normal not to have a bowel movement for several days after delivery. To avoid getting constipated, you may drink prune juice or take an over-the-counter product such as milk-of-magnesia or colace.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENT:
    If you do not have an appointment when you leave the hospital, call the office the next business day to arrange for an appointment within 2-3 weeks of your surgery.

    IF YOU NOTICE ANY of the FOLLOWING:
    • Fever > 100.4 on two occasions, 4 hours apart.
    • Pus coming out of the incision.
    • Vaginal bleeding heavier than a period.
    • Pain that is not controlled by the prescribed medicines and/or does not lessen with time.
    • Unable to keep down liquids.
    • Redness, swelling or bruising around the incision which is worsening day-after-day.

    YOU SHOULD:
    • Call for a same day appointment
    • Go to urgent care.
    • Go to the Emergency Room.

    To leave a non-urgent message for your physician, call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Newborn Circumcision

    • The gauze on the penis will soak off easily in the bath. Once it comes off, it does not need to be replaced.
    • If bleeding occurs, apply gentle pressure with your thumb and index finger, up to five (5) minutes. If excessive bleeding occurs, go to the emergency room.
    • Change diapers often so that urine and feces do not irritate the area.
    • Wash the penis gently with soap and water daily after the first 24 hours.
    • Apply Neosporin or generic triple antibiotic ointment around the circumcised area during the first week to help prevent irritation and infection of the surgical area and to help expedite healing.

    If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to call the office.

    This information is provided as a resource only and is not intended to be a recommendation or a substitute for consultation with Dr. Hage regarding your health and needs.

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    Absorbable Skin Staples

    Dr. Hage cares about your ‘total surgical experience’, and uses absorbable skin staples to close your incision. These staples are place underneath the skin to create a comfortable and cosmetic incision closure. This rapid closure method reduces the time under anesthesia in surgery. Clinical studies show that the use of these absorbable staples may result in lower would complications than metal skin staples or suture, including Surgical Site Infections. Absorbable staples are not like metal skin staples that puncture the the skin resulting in increased pain and discomfort, and a less than optimal cosmetic results. And, metal staples must be removed post-operatively. Over 500,000 patients throughout the world have benefited from the INSORB Skin Closure Modality.

    droppedImage-1

    WHAT ARE ABSORBABLE SKIN STAPLES MADE OF?
    Absorbable skin staples are made from the same types of polymers as many of the absorbable sutures. In this case, absorbable staples are comprised of a co-polymer of polylactic acid and poly glycolic acid. This co-polymer has a well-established clinical history as a safe and effective closure material.
    Tissue studies have shown that the absorbable staple polymer is very benign and causes a lower inflammatory response compared to certain absorbable suture materials.

    droppedImage_1

    HOW DO ABSORBABLE STAPLES DEGRADE & HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE?
    Just like absorbable sutures, absorbable staples degrade by a process of heat and hydrolysis. What happens is the body gets the staples ‘wet’ and the body’s elevated temperature begins the process of ‘breaking down’ the materials. Typically, the absorbable staples are essentially absorbed (i.e., less than 40% of the original weight) within 90 to 120 days. Eventually, the dissolved polymer is safely absorbed and excreted by the body.

    IS IT NORMAL TO FEEL OR SEE TINY BUMPS ON MY INCISION?
    Depending on the skin thickness and the location of the incision, it may be possible to see or feel tiny ‘bumps’ under the skin which may be apparent for a number if months. DO NOT be concerned: “the ‘bumps’ will disappear after the staples are fully absorbed. Below are photos of a surgical incision closed with absorbable staples in the very thin neck tissue. These photos clearly demonstrate that even in this extreme situation, staples were absorbed by six months, and the feel and appearance of the incision continuously improved.

    droppedImage_2

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  • Pap Smear Reminders

    Infection with the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is very common in both women and men. There are more than 100 types of this virus and some of these have been linked to genital warts and cancer of the cervix. There is a vaccine that prevents the two types of HPV that cause the most cases of cancer and the two types that cause most cases of genital warts. It is critical that all women have a PAP Smear every year.
    If you would to be reminded to get your PAP Smear, please follow the link to http://www.health.gov.au/internet/screening/publishing.nsf/Content/register to link you to a site for PAP Smear reminders.

  • Pap Smear Abnormalities

    Please CLICK HERE to open an important link to information about PAP Smear Abnormalities.

  • daVinci Technology

    It is the removal of the uterus through “band-aid” size incisions in the belly using the assistance of a high-tech robotic system that enhances the surgeons ability to perform more complex surgeries in a much less invasive way. You can read more at www.davincisurgery.com .

    Dr. Hage is one of very few surgeons performing robotic assisted gynecologic surgery, including Da Vinci Hysterectomy in Redlands. To see if you are a candidate, please call (909) 748-6065 to schedule your consultation with Dr. Hage.

  • Gynecological Cancers

    To access the California Department of Healthcare Services for more information on gynecologic cancers, go to this link www.dhs.ca.gov. You will be directed to the site in a new window.

    And to access the American Cancer Society’s web site for all the information that you need for a cancer screening plan, follow this link American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org). You will be directed to the site in a new window.